Georgia Dome imploded with nearly
5,000 pounds of explosives

Fox News | November 20, 2017

Georgia Dome imploded in Atlanta. Stadium was home to Atlanta Falcons for 25 years.
Georgia Dome imploded in Atlanta. Stadium was home to Atlanta Falcons for 25 years.

One of America's largest domed stadiums was imploded Monday morning as nearly 5,000 pounds of explosives blasted it to smithereens, sending massive plumes of smoke into the air.

The Georgia Dome, which opened in 1992, was flattened in 15 seconds at 7:30 am.

The 71,250-seat dome was the site of high school football state championships, Peach Bowls, SEC championship games, two Super Bowls, 1996 Olympic basketball, three Final Four NCAA basketball tournaments, concerts, pro wrestling and other events.

From 1992-2017 the Dome hosted over 39 million fans at over 1400 events that meant over $7.4 BILLION in economic impact to the State of Ga

Now it has been replaced by the $1.6 billion Mercedes-Benz Stadium right next door.

The Georgia Dome is destroyed in a scheduled implosion on Nov. 20, 2017. It was not only the home of the Atlanta Falcons but also the site of two Super Bowls, 1996 Olympics Games events and NCAA basketball tournaments. (AP)
The Georgia Dome is destroyed in a scheduled implosion on Nov. 20, 2017. It was not only the home of the Atlanta Falcons but
also the site of two Super Bowls, 1996 Olympics Games events and NCAA basketball tournaments. (AP)

Officials said it will take around three months to completely clear the demolished site. It will be cleaned up and repurposed into a tailgating space for Mercedes-Benz Stadium that "will feature unique arts, entertainment and cultural experiences that will bring together local residents, as well as events honoring veterans and active members of the military."

A five-story tall industrial strength curtain was set up between the two stadiums to protect the new venue from damage, officials said. Only 83 feet - less than 30 yards - separates the two venues, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

The new stadium is home to the NFL's Atlanta Falcons, who were former tenants at the Georgia Dome, and Major League Soccer's Atlanta United.

In addition to the retractable roof that opens like a camera lens, Mercedes-Benz Stadium boasts a 1,100-foot "halo board" video display and a giant steel sculpture of a falcon with its 70-foot wingspan at one of the main entrances.

Several streets and parts of Atlanta's transit system were closed, police said, as many of the city's residents watched the blast against the early morning sky.

The idea for the Georgia Dome dates to the mid-1980s, when civic leaders recommended a domed football stadium adjoining the city's largest convention center, the Georgia World Congress Center.